Designing Friction For A Better User Experience

Allegedly, Facebook did some experimenting on a security checkup process, in which examining the privacy and security settings took only a few milliseconds for the user and wasn’t considered thorough enough. To improve the perception, Facebook added some delay, along with a fake progress bar, so that users could get a better understanding about the thoroughness of this process.

We naturally design to try and reduce friction, yet sometimes friction is needed to actually enhance the user experience. This article by Zoltan Kollin provides a wonderfully comprehensive overview and examples of where adding delays and additional steps is a desirable quality within a product.

Halide: How to Design for iPhone X (without an iPhone X)

Fascinating article from the developers of the highly acclaimed Halide camera app for iOS on how they redesigned the app for the iPhone X before it was even announced.

When it comes to reading, most of us read from left to right, but as humans we reach things from the bottom up.

If you design with this in mind, it’s called ‘Reachable UI’.

This is a way of thinking that more designers need to seriously consider; as devices get taller, interactions need to be increasingly accessible from the bottom of the screen.

I found it was quite difficult to figure out what was ergonomically sound without an actual device to test on.

Then, Ben built an iPhone X.

I love this. Since the app was being designed before the iPhone X had been revealed, let alone shipped, it was absolutely necessary to get a feel for its proportions.

Buttons that require a tap were put in the area that was best for interacting

The bottom quarter of the screen. Makes sense.

We adjusted these to fit the ergonomics of the new device; for exposure adjustment, we ensured you could compensate for at least 5 EV (exposure values) with your thumb, giving you great exposure adjustment without requiring serious finger gymnastics.

The importance of ergonomics within an app’s design cannot be understated. Not only does this make the UI more functional, but to the user the entire app feels like a better thought out and more cohesive experience – not a battle against the screen to access functions.

In the case of Halide, buttons that require taps are in the bottom quarter of the screen, and functions that can be controlled with less accuracy such as a swipe, in the prime space where thumbs can pivot yet don’t need to reach the opposite side of the device.

Testing on a physical mockup proves valuable; speeding up the learning process in-house rather than when the app ships, leading to a better first experience for users.

Technology is making us do life wrong

Somewhere, somehow, all the unpredictability of life has started to escape me.

-Lauren Rabaino, The Verge

An article by The Verge clicked with some thoughts that were at the back of my mind. I enjoy technology, I like reading about it and playing with it, however when it comes to my day-to-day life, I don’t really want to see it. Sure, I’ll use it because it isn’t something that can be easily escaped and it’s damn convenient, but I don’t want to spend all day looking at it.

Not only is this quite plainly unhealthy, you miss what’s happening. If you’re doing something else such as eating whilst looking at a screen, chances are you’re not paying attention to that other thing – missing out on other experiences. For example, everyday on my commute back, I’m staring aimlessly into my laptop screen, reading articles like this one linked to The Verge, whilst not once have I looked outside of my train carriage window to see where I actually am, and what’s around me. That’s bad.

It used to be fairly easy to look away, outside of work you didn’t necessarily feel the need to use a computer, however now seeking the information and data that technology can provide is engrained into our lives and we have the ability to discover everything without even needing to move.

Apparently, we have now reached a stage so dependant on technology that we actually need to use it to help us get lost. People have actually made apps to take you somewhere unplanned. Here’s an idea that you can have for free, leave your tech at home and just go and explore somewhere.

These raw thoughts are edging on crux of The Verge’s article; that sometimes technology takes the fun out of life. Perhaps we should look around and enjoy the world around us instead of staring down into our phone screens. Perhaps, also, we should take a step back from technology and try and find things on our own. If we keep our eyes open and remove the technology that’s obscuring our view , who knows what else we may see? Where’s the fun in seeing the world through a screen when we can actually live and experience it?

If you have no surprises in your life, you’re doing it wrong | The Verge.

The Messy Business Of Reinventing Happiness | Fast Company

A fascinating piece of investigative journalism that is deeply insightful, exploring how Disney realised they needed to reinvent their Parks business, and just how they made the ‘Next Generation Experience’ happen.

It shows the challenges, obstacles and pitfalls of trying to bring such a drastic change to Disney, but also why change is necessary for companies to survive.

Well worth a read.

The Messy Business Of Reinventing Happiness | Fast Company | Business + Innovation.

This Incredible Urban Park Will Be Inside One Of The World’s Busiest Airports

I love this. Design can help us remember who we are and make us more conscious of the world around us.

This Incredible Urban Park Will Be Inside One Of The Worlds Busiest Airports | Co.Exist 

Bringing nature into design allows us to escape the harshness of reality and the busyness of life.

Maybe I just really like green spaces.